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The Wallflowers - Rebel, sweetheart

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music777
18.02.2005 - 13:34 Uhr
Endlich gibt es ein neues Album der Folk-Rocker um Jakob Dylan.

http://www.thewallflowers.com/news/news.asp

"We're very excited to announce that The Wallflowers will release their first album in three years, Rebel, Sweetheart on May 24th. The album’s first single is called "The Beautiful Side Of Somewhere" and will be released to radio in mid-March. The album was produced by Brendan O’Brien and recorded at Southern Tracks Recording in Atlanta during the summer and fall of 2004.

The band will tour extensively throughout the U.S. and the world following the album's release.


The track listing for Rebel, Sweetheart:

Days Of Wonder

The Passenger

The Beautiful Side Of Somewhere

Here He Comes (Confessions of a Drunken Marionette)

We're Already There

God Says Nothing Back

Back To California

I Am A Building

From The Bottom Of My Heart

Nearly Beloved

How Far You've Come

All Things New Again "

Laura
23.02.2005 - 23:58 Uhr
ich kanns kaum erwarten! ich gehoer zu den wenigen glueckluchen, die schon zwei lieder der neuen cd live gehoert hat (How Far You've Come live im juli 2003 und online bei kcrw.com und Here He Comes im Juni 2004 in Seattle, als es noch The Drunken Marionette hiess).. wenn die anderen titel auch nur annaehernd so gut sind wie die beiden, dann wird das bei weitem ihr bestes neues album!

www.wallflowers.com
music777
24.02.2005 - 12:32 Uhr
Wer anspruchsvollen Folkrock mag, sollte sich die Musik von Peter Himmelman anhören (Schwiegersohn von Bob Dylan).

Auf www.peterhimmelman.com gibt es ca. 100 legale, vollständige free mp3 Downloads aus seinen Alben, die seine musikalische Klasse zeigen.

Mehr gibt es im "Peter Himmelman" Thread.
Laura
24.02.2005 - 13:38 Uhr
WHOA!!! wenn du Peter Himmelman magst (ich LIEBE Unstoppable Forces), dann kennst du vielleicht Trampoline Records??

das ist ein indie label, das Rami Jaffee von den Wallflowers und Pete Yorn zusammen mit Marc Dauer (der hat zuletzt Minnie Drivers album produziert) gegründet wurde, und platz für so viele geniale musiker hat.. darunter auch PETER HIMMELMAN, PETE DROGE, ETHAN JOHNS (produzent von Kings Of Leon, Ryan Adams), WALLFLOWERS, PETE YORN, LIZ PHAIR, MINIBAR (die schon für die Wallflowers, Jayhawks und Old 97s opening act gemacht habn..) und viele mehr..

wenn du die art von musik mags, geh unbedingt mal zu www.trampolinerecords.com

ps: das krcw.com set von peter himmelman ist auch wunderschön..
nochmal Laura
24.02.2005 - 13:43 Uhr
mist, jetzt hab ich doch bei all dem trampoline plugging glatt vergessen zu posten, as ich eigentlich posten wollte..

ausm Rolling Stone Magazine:

"Jakob Dylan Talks "Rebel"

Wallflowers frontman tackles God, war and drunken puppets on fifth album


Four albums and more than a decade down the line, the Wallflowers return on May 24th with Rebel, Sweetheart, the follow-up to 2002's Red Letter Days. Recorded with veteran rock producer Brendan O'Brien (Pearl Jam, Bruce Springsteen), the album showcases more of singer-songwriter Jakob Dylan's meticulously crafted songs, with topics ranging from the war in Iraq to failed friendships. The band -- singer-guitarist Dylan, keyboardist Rami Jaffee, bassist Greg Richling and new drummer Fred Eltringham (Ben Kweller) -- will launch a tour in support of Rebel at the end of April. Dylan speaks to Rolling Stone about songwriting, his secret sense of humor and not behaving like Axl Rose.

So the band's got a new drummer . . .

Fred's been with us for almost two years, and it seems like he's been in the band for ages. Hey, maybe it took us fifteen years to get this right.

So this wasn't a Spinal Tap scenario?

No, nobody blew up or disintegrated -- although maybe that's something for us to keep an eye on.

What else has changed for you since Red Letter Days?

What I do is pretty consistent, which is to write about what I see around me and how I see it. I did that with Red Letter Days as well, when a lot of things seemed bleak. We're still definitely immersed in that same bleakness, but those are fertile images to work with. As a songwriter I let that all in.

You're talking about the war in Iraq?

Yes, but this is not the tsunami record, it's not the post-9/11 record, but all of that is the truth of the times. It's unavoidable.

In the opener, "Days of Wonder," there's that line, "Happy birthday to the war."

That specific line was written on the birthday of the war. I think it was pretty startling for all of us -- when it started, we hoped it would be brief, and then there we were a year later. Even now, there doesn't seem to be a way out.

How did you personally deal with the presidential election?

Obviously disappointed. I was trying to be a realist, so it certainly wasn't a shock. I think a lot of people tried their best to make a difference -- there were some artists who tried very hard. And after a certain point, the fight seemed insurmountable. But some progress has been made: When I was eighteen, no one was talking about voting -- that was for the grownups. And being able to vote is a real benefit of being a citizen here.

Some of the material on this album is really catchy, straight-up rock -- but when you listen more closely, the lyrics are surprisingly dark.

I'm aware of that, the contradiction of melody and lyric, but it's not a conscious approach. Going into a song and knowing that you have a dark theme to write about and then specifically looking for a minor melody -- I'd never do that.

What was the writing process like for Rebel?

The writing happened pretty organically. There was a great immediacy with the material on my part, and the band was ready to go. And Brendan O'Brien doesn't like to work in L.A., which was great for us, not to work in our town. So we recorded in Atlanta.

What was it about his style that worked for you?

We haven't really done things this way since our first record: quick and live -- which isn't to be confused with not paying attention. You can get bogged down and lose the plot and get lost in the studio for months. But with Brendan, he likes to work quickly, and that works if you believe in your instincts. I would say that more than half the time, people's instincts on an album are right, and if you [mistrust them], you end up wasting a lot of time.

I really took to the song "Here He Comes" [sample lyrics: "Here comes your drunken marionette/Dragging his mess of threads/There at the bar pulling smoke to his lungs"]. The image of a drunk puppet -- there's a real dark humor to that.

I'm glad someone picked up on the sense of sardonic humor in what I write. I think maybe it's the nature of the songs that I write that suggest too much seriousness. But there's humor throughout the record.

Well, a song like "God Says Nothing Back," for instance, is very melancholy, about being shut out by the world, given no answers. Do you think there's something in you, that you're perhaps naturally a cynic?

Everything seems to be involved in those four subjects: God, time, love and death. I would never say I'm philosophical -- that would certainly sound pretentious. That's just what I naturally write about.

You're a family man now. Do you find your family influences your music?

It's not conscious, but I am raising three kids at a time when I certainly have concerns about where the world is headed. We're living at a time when it's possible that the world could just pop some day. I think the grounds for writing songs now are as thrilling as maybe in the mid-Sixties, when there was something in the air. I'm still a fan of simpler music, whether it's about cars or girls -- it can be wildly entertaining. And I certainly hold onto the right to someday write a song that's about fluff.

You once said that, as a songwriter and musician, studying your craft should come before any concerns about being "original."

That was something that occurred to me a while ago. The Pet Rock was original, you know, but after that holiday season, it kind of went on the shelf. You can listen to someone's record and say, "Yes, that person's innovative -- but I don't want to listen to that again." I think about writing music that can be listened to again and again.

People who are original are dropped in from outer space. They're not the people trying to be innovators -- I've always thought that was a fruitless effort. I'm a fan of tradition. Steve Earle is doing his best work now, but no one's calling him original.

You know, you have to be skeptical of records you buy these days because of the technology being used to make them. There's so much pressure being put on the "tween" market, I guess they call it. Today it's really easy to get by not knowing what you're doing: If you're an actress and you want to make a record, you can put one out. For those people who were so disappointed that they'd bought Milli Vanilli's record because they didn't sing on it, at least those were actual human voices they were listening to.

Is there any band in particular that you admire for its longevity, and its evolution over time?

The Who. Pete Townshend was clued into something early on: The sound will always evolve, but his perspective on things was what was going to change how the band would evolve. He starts out writing "Magic Bus," and he goes on to write "Won't Get Fooled Again." I'll listen to anything he puts out.

After years of playing live, do you feel pressure to play some of your older numbers just for the fans?

Is "6th Avenue Heartache" my favorite song to play every night? I don't think so. But I've never really related to the idea that I can't play yet because I'm not in the right headspace, or I can't play this song anymore because I've stopped relating to it. When I'm at a show, I'm not there to see how an artist feels that night -- you know, like the notorious stories about Axl Rose? In all these years, I've cancelled one show, because of extreme illness. You have to take your job seriously -- and don't pretend it's not a job. Get over it. I prefer to play as often as possible, but you're not going to be inspired seven nights a week. If you're not feeling it, then go out there and fake it. Don't be an asshole.

Um, wait. That said, I am always inspired [laughs]. I am always ready to go. The Wallflowers are always ready to go.


ALEX MAR
(Posted Feb 18, 2005)"

jakob rocks.. der is so cool und nett noch dazu!! so wie die restlichen wallflowers auch!
Laura
27.02.2005 - 21:31 Uhr
will nicht, dass das hier ganz untergeht..

ihr könnt euch schon eins der neues lieder hier anhören..

http://www.kcrw.com/cgi-bin/db/kcrw.pl?show_code=gz&air_date=7/19/03&tmplt_type=show

das lied How Far You've Come ist so um die 20. minute rum.. ich find es wunderschön..

music777
27.02.2005 - 22:43 Uhr
@Laura:
Danke für den Link.
Eine wirklich schöne Ballade mit klugem Arrangement. Ich freue mich auf das Album.
Laura
28.02.2005 - 00:27 Uhr
ja find ich auch.. allerdings weiss ich gar nicht, ob das lied im endeffekt so aufs album kommt, denn auf der nächsten tour haben sie es nur mit gitarre und akkordion gespielt (klingt auch toll!) und irgendwann hiess es mal, dass es aufm album ein anderes arrangement haben wird.. aber der text ist einfach genial..

How Far You've Come

You'd have a wonderful day
If you could see how lucky you are
Now don't get carried away with your heart
You're better where you are

You're not the only one
who's failed to hang on to a moving a star
Now don't be sorry
What's done now is done
And this is who you are

These days feel numbered and long
There's no one to speak of
There's no one at all
But you're not the reason that everyone's gone
That's not how they are

There is no system to change
No conditions are made
No permissions to start
Now don't go drawing lines in the sand
That's not who you are

Sometimes a high wall is just a wall
Sometimes it's only there to make sure you feel small
Or it may be there to save you
from the depths of a much deeper fall

The truth will not set you free
It's ok to believe
That you're not good enough
God is not angry, not blind deaf or dumb
He knows how far you've come
He knows how far you've come
He knows how far you've come
music777
11.03.2005 - 13:57 Uhr
ein aktuelles Wallfowers Interview der Denver Post:

"The Wallflowers come back out of the shadows

By Ricardo Baca
Denver Post Pop Music Critic


Jakob Dylan's quest-plagued with a sense of predestination from Day One-is rather epic when put into perspective.

More than a dozen years after his debut and nine years after attaining stardom amid the mid-'90s' fascination with rootsy Americana music, the son of America's most celebrated songwriter (that would be Bob) perseveres out of the mainstream's eye - but still in its conscience - in his quest for the perfect song, the perfect record and a semi-perfect world.

"If you're a songwriter today, it's overwhelming what there is to work with right now," Dylan said earlier this week via telephone from Los Angeles.

"Bringing Down the Horse," the 1996 album from Dylan's group The Wallflowers, helped define an era that saw the ascendancy of Alanis and Celine, fostered "The Macarena" and Mariah Carey, and mused briefly over Dishwalla and Coolio. Tracks such as "6th Avenue Heartache" and "One Headlight" filled a hole, the public's need for authenticity and sincerity in a time lacking it. Then, after a year atop the charts, Dylan and his fellow Wallflowers seemed to vanish.

The Wallflowers, who play the Gothic on Monday, never fully went away - but you definitely had to be looking for the band to know it still existed. The band kicked "Horse" until it was virtually dead, and four years later released 2000's "Breach." In 2002 the band gave us the critically acclaimed "Red Letter Days." Come May 24, the band will release its fifth LP, "Rebel, Sweetheart," a record that has Dylan talking, touring and playing at the South by Southwest music festival for his first time ever.

"To me it's a real band, cohesive effort, as it was since the first record in '92," said Dylan. "It was just us locked up in a studio in Atlanta with Brendan O'Brien producing and playing on guitar."

Everybody who works with O'Brien, from Eddie Vedder to Bruce Springsteen, is careful to note his musical virtuosity. Dylan agrees that his fill-in on guitar, a vacant position in The Wallflowers' lineup for a while now, was crucial.

"If he didn't want to be a producer, he could certainly be a session guitar player," Dylan said.

With the help of O'Brien behind the boards, the band made something Dylan calls "a very alive record - not necessarily live, as people say, but alive."

It's tricky territory, the differences between live sound and an alive aesthetic. Some prefer a mix of both, going for a jangly one-take sound that has a pulse and a reactive nervous system. But Dylan knew where he wanted to go with "Rebel, Sweetheart."

"When I hear someone say they recorded 'live,' (it means) they didn't overdub. Most people overdub," he said. "That image of 'live' to me sounds like a show. But 'alive' to me is something you're able to get on tape, something that breathes. I've done tracks where you labor and you work and you end up sucking the life out them.

"But this record, from top to bottom, isn't like that. It only took us about 3 1/2 weeks to get the majority of it done."

While the album addresses the war and the current administration - Dylan was disappointed after last year's presidential election - he doesn't see it as his responsibility to be a mouthpiece for any cause.

"I relate to that stuff on a life level," said Dylan, a proud father of three who consciously observes the world around him as both artist and parent. "I'm just like anybody else just trying to get through.

"But as far as writing manifestos on my website ... I've never considered the band a political band," he said. "There are tones and lyrics throughout the music - it's impossible to keep it out of the music.

"But I don't get too involved in telling people what to think. Everybody's gotta realize that for themselves. I don't want to get on a soapbox or anything. I don't think (the public) should take that information from musicians. I think most of them should keep their noses out of it - especially from the artist community. It's too easy to say what you support. But it's not enough."

His approach to songwriting has been likened to his father's, but to hear the younger spell it out truly shows the elder's influence.

"It's always an option to be self-centered and write those songs about yourself, but I don't relate to that," he said. "Finding a way to write songs about what's going on in this moment and make them timeless is more of what I'm always going for."

Too often, when critics refer to the younger Dylan's music as timeless or surprisingly mature, they reflect on the supposed influence Tom Petty must have had on a young Jakob, who was raised in Los Angeles by his mother, Sara Lowndes, after she and Dylan divorced in 1977. Their son was 7 at the time.

But while Dylan admires Petty for his skill and longevity, he never has claimed the artist as a direct inspiration.

"Sure, we're both American singer-songwriters with a Hammond B3 player," Dylan said. "But that's it."

"
Laura
13.03.2005 - 01:49 Uhr
danke, das interview ist echt interessant! ich bin so gespannt auf das neue album! wenn ich in LA wohnen würde, würd ich zu einer dieser listening parties gehen, dies für rebel, sweetheart jetz gibt..

und was für einen Hammond B3 player die haben (hatte gestern geburtstag, der rami)

ich wage zu behaupten, dass fast jeder in diesem forum eine platte besitzt auf der rami jaffee mitgespielt hat.. könnt ja mal checken

http://ramijaffee.com/albums.php
music777
13.03.2005 - 11:57 Uhr
Das Wallflowers-Interview der Kansas City Star:

"Posted on Thu, Mar. 10, 2005


Success for Wallflower is

By TIMOTHY FINN

The Kansas City Star


picture: Interscope Records
Jakob Dylan (second from right) is Bob Dylan's youngest son, but musically he is not his father. “I never worried about it too much because I didn't see anything I could possibly do about it. Anyone who came to see me solely for that reason went away very disappointed. They didn't get what they were looking for. Eventually, after showing up a couple of times and yelling out their favorite 30-year-old song and not hearing it played, they gave up. I guess some people thought it was funny. I thought it was odd”


The song “Days of Wonder” on the upcoming Wallflowers album includes a line about war — the one that has been atop the news charts for exactly two years now.

“Happy birthday to the war,” goes Jakob Dylan's lyric, and if that news prompts you to rejoice and assume the chip is finally emulating the old block, well, sorry. Son of Bob has some old news for you:
The Wallflowers are still just an adult-alternative rock band with no overt political inclinations.

“I think that song is getting a little misunderstood,” Jakob Dylan said last week from his hometown of Los Angeles. “When I write, I write about everything around me, whatever it may be. I do write topically, and these days the war is part of the dominant theme. It's relevant to all of us.
“But this is in no way a record like ‘American Idiot'; I don't address things quite that way.”

The new record, “Rebel, Sweetheart,” is due to be released May 24. It'll be the band's fifth full-length record since 1992 and its first since November 2002. The Wallflowers may not make records like Green Day, but like that punk band, which broke into the music scene in the early 1990s, the Wallflowers have soldiered on, so to speak, through changes in music fashion and despite some dismissive critical reviews. According to Dylan, the band is now about 15 years old. So what's the attraction these many years later for a married father of three children in his mid-30s?

“I suppose, ideologically, it's still the same as it was when I was 19,” he said. “It begins with concerns about nothing but the music and the camaraderie. It's still that way. The band is my home base. We've been pretty tight for more than a dozen years. This version of the band isn't the original band, but Rami (Jaffee) has been there for most of the time and Greg (Reichling) has been our bass player for 12 years.

“We've never had to struggle to stay together or anything. Like any band, we've made a few unfortunate choices, and some people didn't work out.”

One who didn't was drummer Mario Calire, who left the band in 2003 and has been replaced by Fred Eltringham, who puts his work with Ben Kweller atop his résumé. New drummers, longtime bass player, the one and only Jaffee on keyboards: It hasn't affected the way Dylan makes music, which
has always been as much (or more) about craftwork and commercial appeal as it has been about telling stories and persuading minds.

That's one reason he hired Brendan O'Brien to produce “Rebel”: O'Brien can bring out the crackle, pop and sheen in any band (see Bruce Springsteen's “The Rising”).

“I've spoken to him about every record,” Dylan said, “and it was never the right place or the right time. This time it worked out. He has a great track record with a lot of different artists who end up doing their best material. One thing I look at is, do artists go back to a producer for a second or third album? People go back to Brendan.

“Brendan tends to work quickly. With some producers, the process can go on for six or eight months — so long you're not sure exactly what you're doing anymore. This record sounds very alive and immediate. It's the typical speech: ‘This is our finest record yet.' But it's true. Having Fred on drums has made a big difference.”

He's right; that's as typical as an aging athlete saying, “I'm in the best shape of my career.” Sometime in late May/early June, the critics will have their say, however, and they have been everything from harsh and indifferent to kind and gentle to the Wallflowers, thanks, no doubt, to his lineage, which comes with a burden that cuts both ways. He may be his father's youngest son, but musically he is definitely not his dad — a truth Jakob could not escape for a long time, especially from people who resented the fact that his music lacked the gravity and importance of his father's.

“That was just the lay of the land back then,” he said. “I never worried about it too much because I didn't see anything I could possibly do about it. Anyone who came to see me solely for that reason went away very disappointed. They didn't get what they were looking for. Eventually, after showing up a couple of times and yelling out their favorite 30-year-old song and not hearing it played, they gave up. I guess some people thought it was funny. I thought it was odd.

“And as far as people showing up just to see me, like I was the bearded lady at the circus, that has faded away, too. At least if they're still present, they're not making themselves known to me.”
"
Laura
14.03.2005 - 23:14 Uhr
ausm US Rolling Stone:
(random notes)

Fresh-Cut Wallflowers
"I am comfortable in admitting that not only am I not a good gambler, but I don't like it," says Jakob Dylan, who recently got sucked into a blackjack table in Las Vegas with his band, the Wallflowers. "I always lose. But I've come to expect to lose." The Flowers are back (with a sick new drummer, Fred Eltringham, whom Dylan calls "a godsend") and in May will release their hardest-rocking album yet, Rebel, Sweetheart. So did the band members end up broke and having to sing for their supper? Almost. "Our keyboard player, Rami Jaffee, managed to lose all his money, well over a thousand bucks," says Dylan. "But at the airport, on our way home, he played a couple of slots and doubled up."

oh wie ich sie liebe!!! ich hab mal nach ner show mit rami geredet und da hat er erzählt, er hätte neulich in las vegas 2000 dollar gewonnen und hätte davon seinm freund dean delray (der damals opening act gemacht hat) eine lederjacke gekauft! der rockt so sehr, der rami!
music777
15.03.2005 - 21:00 Uhr
www.wallflowers.com

"The Wallflowers in Lawrence News:

The band will play Liberty Hall in Lawrence, Kansas tonight. Lawrence Journal World features a new interview and photo with the band to preview tonight's show. Some of the interview is "enhanced" (audio clips of some interview questions). "

Hier gehts zur Webseite .


Uh huh him
15.03.2005 - 21:04 Uhr
ihr zwei scheint euch ja beinahe zu battlen. Und wieso darf der mit Nachname Dylan heißen? So gut?
Uwe
15.03.2005 - 21:36 Uhr
Hallo !!!

Hat zufällig jemand von euch den Wallflowers-Song "Lawjers, Guns & Government" (soll auf irgendnem U.S.-Sampler erschienen sein) ???

Ansonsten freue ich mich wie Hulle auf die neue CD. Der Vorgänger und das Hamburg-Konzert waren klasse!!!
Laura
15.03.2005 - 23:10 Uhr
das Lied heisst "Lawyers, Guns & Money" und ist ein Warren Zevon und ist auf dem grandiosen Warren Zevon tribute Album "Enjoy Every Sandwich - The Songs Of Warren Zevon" drauf, auf dem neben den Wallflowers auch Bob Dylan, Bruce Springsteen, Jackson Browne, Jordan Zevon, the Pixies, Pete Yorn und andere vertreten sind..

das ist auch in Deutschland im Handel erhältlich und ist SUPER!!!

und, der darf mit nachnahmen Dylan heissen, weil er Bob's Sohn ist. und er ist selber, selbständig, eigenständig und völlig unabhängig ein sehr guter künstler, ebenso wie die band!

TOUR HAT BEGONNEN!!!!! weeee!!! :)
Uh huh him
16.03.2005 - 14:13 Uhr
hui :-)

da hätte ich ne andere Antwort erwartet (keine Ironie)
Laura
16.03.2005 - 23:58 Uhr
sorry, hab das etwas abgekürzt, weil ichs ziemlich ungerecht finde, dass der an dauernd mit seinem vater verglichen wird.. die band hat das nie als joker ausgespielt oder sonst an die grosse glocke gehängt, jakob hat einfach sein bestes gegeben und ich finde das sehr gut.. ich bin ebenfalls ein sehr grosser bob dylan fan und bin so auch auf die wallflowers gekommen, bin also weit entfernt zu sagen, jakob dylan sei irgendwie besser oder so.. ich finde nur, fairerweise sollte man jakob nicht mit jemandem vergleichen, mit dem zu vergleichen auch für so ziemlich jeden anderen singer/songwriter eine niederlage wäre.. auch wenn er sein vater ist..

ich hoffe, dass hat das etwas erklärt..

und die setlist von gestern nacht war ja mal toll:

Lawrence, KS

6th Avenue Heartache
Everything I Need
Here He Comes (Confessions of a Drunken Marionette)
Back to California
Letters From the Wasteland
The Passenger
Heroes
Nearly Beloved
Some Flowers Bloom Dead
We're Already There
Three Marlenas
Invisible City
Hand Me Down (just Jakob and Rami)
One Headlight (1/2 acoustic, 1/2 full band)
Sleepwalker
God Don't Make Lonely Girls
Encores:
Beautiful Side of Somewhere
Somebody Else's Money
The Difference
Isgard
19.03.2005 - 01:45 Uhr
Also, bin da (völlig unvereingenommen...) Lauras Meinung. Die Wallflowers sand halt einfach die Besten! Das neue Album wird´s dann auch nochmal bestätigen.
Hört einfach auf das was euch das Mädel sagt!
Sie hat (immer) Recht. punkt aus ende.

Laura
20.03.2005 - 00:08 Uhr

Isgard, du hast soooo recht.. in allem! lol

:)



Horst Köhler
20.03.2005 - 00:14 Uhr
@Laura: Sehr gut, dass du hier bist.
Laura
20.03.2005 - 00:37 Uhr
horst, vielen dank!.... warum denn?

Horst Köhler
20.03.2005 - 00:48 Uhr
@Laura: Weil es hier im Forum scheinbar nur wenig Leute gibt, die sich für Singer/Songwriter interessieren oder sich gar damit auskennen. Auch drei, vier Plattentests-Schreiber lesen privat wohl am liebsten "Visions". (Das soll jetzt kein Angriff sein, jedem das Seine und seinen Geschmack). Die Erwähnung von Warren Zevon hier im Forum ist schon mal Gold wert. Und die von Jakob Dylan natürlich auch ;-)
Laura
20.03.2005 - 00:53 Uhr
oohh absolut!
bin ein grosser Warren Zevon fan geworden.. obwohl ich fairerweise zugeben muss, dass ich den erst 2002 kennengelernt habe, als Bob dylan einige Zevon stücke live spielte (darunter auch die Mutineer aufnahme von Enjoy Every Sandwich und eins meiner lieblings zevon lieder, Accidentally like A Matyr..)

Horst Köhler
20.03.2005 - 01:01 Uhr
Oh, ich mag "hasten down the wind" am liebsten und "genius". na egal, wollte ja damit auch nur sagen, dass hier beispielsweise von armin wohl nie ein kommentar zu zevon, dylan oder newman zu erwarten ist. außer, es kommt irgendeine pressemeldung rein...;-)
Laura
20.03.2005 - 01:13 Uhr
oh, genius is wunderschön! hasten down the wind auch! und searching for a heart!!!
das hab ich in paris immer gehört wenn ich mir so isoliert vorkam..
(oder auch Splendid Isolation.. je nachdem.. lol)
Horst Köhler
20.03.2005 - 02:15 Uhr
Oder "Reconsider Me"....;-))Oder, oder...
Laura
20.03.2005 - 03:15 Uhr
Poor Poor Pitiful Me!
Horst Köhler
20.03.2005 - 03:25 Uhr
Nicht zu vergessen die Klassiker: "Lawyers, Guns & Money" ! "The French Inhaler"! Na, "Reconsider Me" ist schon mit das schönste....kennen die meisten nun leider nur als Songtitel von Moneybrother ;-)
Laura
20.03.2005 - 03:28 Uhr
ich war soo überrascht als ich den moneybrother songtitel gelesen hab, weil ich dachte, das sei ein WZ cover..
ich mag auch Carmelita sehr gern..
und Lawyers, Guns&Money is toll.. AUCH in der WF version..
Laura
20.03.2005 - 03:29 Uhr
ich find übrigens auch Studebaker in der Jordan Zevon version ganz toll.. mit Jakob dylan an den background vocals!
Horst Köhler
20.03.2005 - 04:15 Uhr
Yep. die "studebaker"-version ist toll! hab mich bei "reconsider me " von moneybrother auch gewundert. der song ist für mich aber eher eine springsteen-parodie ;-)
Horst Köhler
20.03.2005 - 04:19 Uhr
hast du die warren zevon-dvd, diese VH-1-dokumentation? absolut großartig und rührend! wir sollten jetzt langsam mal nen warren zevon-thread eröffnen! leider wird sich niemand außer uns beiden daran beteiligen. und leider weiß ich auch gar nicht, wie man einen neuen thread eröffnet. jedenfalls nicht spontan.
music777
21.03.2005 - 13:46 Uhr
Die Wallflowers im Radio:

www.wallflowers.com:

"The Wallflowers on the Radio this week!
The Wallflowers will be doing a series of radio interviews and performances this week (March 21st-25th).
Check the March Radio Shows page to view cities, stations, times, and whether or not there is an online stream. Some information will be updated frequently, so check the page often this week."

Hoffentlich gibts dann neue Songs aus dem kommenden Album.

@Horst Köhler, Laura:
Hier ist der Warren Zevon-thread.
Laura
22.03.2005 - 20:37 Uhr
JA! hab gestern im atlanta radio 99x das erste mal die brandneue single BEAUTIFUL SIDE OF SOMEWHERE live gehört!!!!

das Lied ist wunderschön.. eine tolle melodie und einen text mit zeilen wie "i am ready to wake up, we're in the exodus on the beautiful side of somewhere, baby" oder (meine lieblingszeile "i am on a platform, covered with dust, i pray they take the both of us"..

ich bin jetzt noch so viel mehr auf Rebel, Sweetheart gespannt, weil ich jetzt sicher gehen kann 8anhand der drei neuen Lieder, die ich kenne), dass das ihr bestes ist!!!!
music777
22.03.2005 - 22:29 Uhr
Die Single "The Beautiful Side Of Somewhere" gibts jetzt auch als Stream auf der offiziellen Webseite der Band. Sie hört sich gut an, könnte ein Hit werden.
Laura
23.03.2005 - 17:31 Uhr
wollte ich auch grad schreiben.. die akustische version war zum weinen schön.. verletzlich, zerbrechlich.. die album version klingt hoffnungsvoller und zuversichtlich.. kann noch nicht sagen, was mir besser gefällt..

auf jeden fall ein guter song!!!
Laura
25.03.2005 - 01:29 Uhr
ein anderes neues Lied ist aufgetaucht: WE'RE ALREADY THERE!! und eine dritte live version von BEAUTIFUL SIDE OF SOMEWHERE und alles mir KLAVIER!!!! es gibt gründe warum rami jaffee als der beliebteste studio keyboarder und erbe von garth huson und al kooper gilt.. der mann ist genial!!!

und We're Already There hat mich grad (fast) zum weinen gebracht.. und das kommt nicht oft vor.. (und die version von BSOS ist bisher auch die beste find ich..)

http://www.island943.com/island_celebs.htm

music777
27.03.2005 - 21:31 Uhr
"We're Already There" gefällt mir sehr gut. Ich finde den Song noch etwas besser als die Single, da er weniger hitkompatibel arrangiert ist.

@Laura:
Beschreib mal den Song "Here He Comes" (Confessions of a Drunken Marionette). Ist der Song einfach, komplex, kurz, episch, langsam, schnell ...? Würde mich sehr interessieren.
Laura
28.03.2005 - 03:10 Uhr
The Wallflowers' performance on 107.1 The Peak in New York will be broadcast on Thursday, March 31 at 7:00 p.m. and rebroadcast on Sunday, April 3 at 9:00 a.m. (all times are Eastern). The Peak does stream online so you can catch either show at this link:
http://www.1071thepeak.com/
The setlist for the performance:
***The Beautiful Side of Somewhere
***Here He Comes (Confessions of a Drunken Marionette)
***We're Already There
***Three Marlenas

das hier gibt dir hoffentlich die chance, das lied zu hören..


also, ich hab das lied letzten juni in seattle gehört und da war es nur jakob und rami, langsam.. rami spielte während der strophen sein casio-ding und während des refrains ("Here he comes, here he comes.." etc.) klavier.. das lied war nicht direkt langsam, aber sehr traurig und akustisch.. ich bin normal nicht so der typ mädchen, der bei jedem song weint, aber da.. naja, war etwas emotional an dem abend..
in dem lied geht es um jemanden, der eine beziehung zu jemandem loslässt, der für ihn nicht gut ist, aber den er immer in schutz genommen hat..

"here comes the drunken marionette
dragging his mess of threads
there in the bar pulling smoke to his lungs
he says 'who will ignore me when you're gone?"

und

"been mainlining bad thought,
been drinking things i wish id not
intoxicated with sad songs (GENIAL!)
who will defend you when im gone?"

die bridge is der HAMMER!!!!

"now carry on, turn the lights low when you go
and in the hours left i hope you feel the things i know i wont"

ich übernehm keine garantie für die texte.. aber das lied ist wahnsinnig schön und traurig!!!
Laura
29.03.2005 - 22:45 Uhr
von http://www.earthfest.com/Default.aspx?tabid=164

Rebel, Sweetheart -- the fifth album from The Wallflowers and their first with producer Brendan O’Brien (Pearl Jam, Bruce Springsteen) -- is the welcome re-introduction to a rock & roll band with a renewed sense of purpose.

“The bright light had been removed from us for a little while, and somehow the music felt pure again,” says Jakob Dylan. “We’re not exactly a new band anymore, but there’s definitely a feeling that we’ve been reinvigorated by so many factors – the new music, first and foremost – and we’ve unburdened ourselves of any outside expectations of what this band is supposed to be.

Expectations are something Jakob Dylan has lived with from the start, and against long odds, The Wallflowers have by any reasonable standard more than lived up to them with a series of albums: 1992’s The Wallflowers (“a bizarre snapshot of a twenty-one year old, which has its charms,” says Dylan), 1996’s commercial breakthrough Bringing Down the Horse which featured the hits “6th Avenue Heartache,” the two-time Grammy winning “One Headlight”, “Three Marlenas” and “The Difference.” With the success of that album, the band toured the world for two years, establishing themselves as one of music’s most important rock & roll bands. Breach, released in 2000, featured the radio and video channel mainstays, “Sleepwalker,” and “Letters From The Wasteland.” Red Letter Days, the band’s most critically-lauded album to date, was released in November, 2003 and spawned the singles, “When You’re On Top,” “How Good It Can Get,” and “Closer To You.”

Despite several personnel changes and a glaring industry spotlight that would severely test its fortitude, the band played on. “Early on, people questioned my reasons for being in a rock & roll band and assumed that I must be hiding out” says Dylan. “A lot of people are surprised that we’re still going. But the truth is I wasn’t hiding out. I grew up listening to rock & roll bands and always wanted to be part of one that mattered.”

The current incarnation of The Wallflowers -- with Dylan as songwriter, lead singer and guitarist, longtime keyboardist Rami Jaffee and bassist Greg Richling now joined by drummer Fred Eltringham, formerly of the Gigolo Aunts -- feels like the fulfillment of that youthful dream. “We’ve had a history of people sticking around the band longer than they probably should,” Dylan admits. “Our intentions weren’t always on the same page. But now with Rami in the band for these past fifteen years, Greg around twelve and Fred, who I’ve known for six years and played with for the last two, everything finally just feels right.”

For one thing, Dylan at long last realized the nature of Rami Jaffee’s true role within The Wallflowers. “Every band has that stage right guy -- usually it’s a guitar player, the guy to lean on, whether it’s Mick Jones to Joe Strummer or Keith Richard to Mick Jagger. Great rock bands are supposed to have that, and it’s always been frustrating not to have a permanent guitarist in The Wallflowers. But making this record, I realized that for this group, Rami is that guy. At the same time, I know a lot of bass players and there’s no one in the world Greg Richling couldn’t play with. And having now played with Fred for close to two years, I sincerely mean it when I say that I feel like we’ve been waiting for him the whole time. Recording this album, it occurred to me that it’s been a hell of a long struggle to get here, but this is it and it’s all been worth it. For these guys, being in a band with somone who writes and sings the songs -- especially someone with the heritage I have -- doesn’t always always bring them the attention they deserve. Not that they complain about it, but it’s a real shame cause I feel it should be obvious to everyone just how much they contribute.”

The other key player on the Rebel, Sweetheart team is acclaimed producer Brendan O’Brien. Before the band recorded Rebel, Sweetheart at Atlanta’s Southern Tracks Recording in the summer and fall of 2004, the producer took a road trip with The Wallflowers as a guest guitarist. “We were going out for three weeks last summer and we thought it’d be really beneficial to have him along, if he were willing. Brendan’s a first-class musician, and that tour allowed us to get a jump start on the record we’d soon be recording.”

That shared road experience proved invaluable once The Wallflowers and O’Brien commenced recording in Atlanta. “With Brendan in the band for a few weeks, we all knew a lot more about how we were going to approach things once we got to the studio,” says Dylan. “For one thing, he refuses to waste time. Usually people like to camp out in a studio and don’t plan on leaving for months. Brendan’s attitude was, “We can do this in four weeks.” It’s not like he was impatient or had other things lined up, it’s his belief – borne out by years of experience in making great records – that if you’re thinking about things too much and making it complicated, than you’re probably doing something wrong.”

On Rebel, Sweetheart, The Wallflowers and O’Brien were clearly doing something right, and the result is the most focused and accomplished album of their career. “It was great for us because we’ve always worked in L.A., and I think that’s why our records have dragged on,” Dylan says. “Recording close to home means that we’re all juggling our work and our personal lives. Of course, that’s what most people have to do every day, but we found out that it’s just not the best way to go about making a record. With Brendan, we worked at a pace that kept us on our toes, and that’s exactly what we needed. I can’t recall the usual tedious time sitting around the studio waiting for food and being bored. We used every minute we were there.”

auf der seite gibts auch radio performances..
Laura
09.04.2005 - 23:45 Uhr
http://www.npr.org/programs/asc/archives/spring05/

God Says Nothing Back..

neuer song.. entschuldigt mich bitte, ich hol mir nur schnell ein taschentuch bevor ich mit antidepressiva hole.. *schniff*

oh gott ist das schön!!!!
Armin
09.05.2005 - 00:11 Uhr
Wie's aussieht, wird das Album zunächst nicht regulär in Deutschland veröffentlicht, sondern ist nur als Import zu haben.
music777
09.05.2005 - 13:01 Uhr
@Armin:
Danke für den Hinweis. Schade. So wird die Band hierzulande nicht bekannter.
music777
14.05.2005 - 12:01 Uhr
Jetzt gibt es eine schön gestaltete Ecard vom neuen Wallflowers-Album:

Rebel Sweetheart Ecard
music777
14.05.2005 - 12:16 Uhr
von www.musicremedy.com:

"Rebel, Sweetheart -- the fifth album from The Wallflowers and their first with producer Brendan O’Brien (Pearl Jam, Bruce Springsteen) -- is the welcome re-introduction to a rock & roll band with a renewed sense of purpose. “The bright light had been removed from us for a little while, and somehow the music felt pure again,” says Jakob Dylan. “We’re not exactly a new band anymore, but there’s definitely a feeling that we’ve been reinvigorated by so many factors – the new music, first and foremost – and we’ve unburdened ourselves of any outside expectations of what this band is supposed to be.

Expectations are something Jakob Dylan has lived with from the start, and against long odds, The Wallflowers have by any reasonable standard more than lived up to them with a series of albums: 1992’s The Wallflowers (“a bizarre snapshot of a twenty-one year old, which has its charms,” says Dylan), 1996’s commercial breakthrough Bringing Down the Horse which featured the hits “6th Avenue Heartache,” the two-time Grammy winning “One Headlight”, “Three Marlenas” and “The Difference.” With the success of that album, the band toured the world for two years, establishing themselves as one of music’s most important rock & roll bands. Breach, released in 2000, featured the radio and video channel mainstays, “Sleepwalker,” and “Letters From The Wasteland.” Red Letter Days, the band’s most critically-lauded album to date, was released in November, 2003 and spawned the singles, “When You’re On Top,” “How Good It Can Get,” and “Closer To You.”

Despite several personnel changes and a glaring industry spotlight that would severely test its fortitude, the band played on. “Early on, people questioned my reasons for being in a rock & roll band and assumed that I must be hiding out” says Dylan. “A lot of people are surprised that we’re still going. But the truth is I wasn’t hiding out. I grew up listening to rock & roll bands and always wanted to be part of one that mattered.”

The current incarnation of The Wallflowers -- with Dylan as songwriter, lead singer and guitarist, longtime keyboardist Rami Jaffee and bassist Greg Richling now joined by drummer Fred Eltringham, formerly of the Gigolo Aunts -- feels like the fulfillment of that youthful dream. “We’ve had a history of people sticking around the band longer than they probably should,” Dylan admits. “Our intentions weren’t always on the same page. But now with Rami in the band for these past fifteen years, Greg around twelve and Fred, who I’ve known for six years and played with for the last two, everything finally just feels right.”

For one thing, Dylan at long last realized the nature of Rami Jaffee’s true role within The Wallflowers. “Every band has that stage right guy -- usually it’s a guitar player, the guy to lean on, whether it’s Mick Jones to Joe Strummer or Keith Richard to Mick Jagger. Great rock bands are supposed to have that, and it’s always been frustrating not to have a permanent guitarist in The Wallflowers. But making this record, I realized that for this group, Rami is that guy. At the same time, I know a lot of bass players and there’s no one in the world Greg Richling couldn’t play with. And having now played with Fred for close to two years, I sincerely mean it when I say that I feel like we’ve been waiting for him the whole time. Recording this album, it occurred to me that it’s been a hell of a long struggle to get here, but this is it and it’s all been worth it. For these guys, being in a band with somone who writes and sings the songs -- especially someone with the heritage I have -- doesn’t always always bring them the attention they deserve. Not that they complain about it, but it’s a real shame cause I feel it should be obvious to everyone just how much they contribute.”

The other key player on the Rebel, Sweetheart team is acclaimed producer Brendan O’Brien. Before the band recorded Rebel, Sweetheart at Atlanta’s Southern Tracks Recording in the summer and fall of 2004, the producer took a road trip with The Wallflowers as a guest guitarist. “We were going out for three weeks last summer and we thought it’d be really beneficial to have him along, if he were willing. Brendan’s a first-class musician, and that tour allowed us to get a jump start on the record we’d soon be recording.”

That shared road experience proved invaluable once The Wallflowers and O’Brien commenced recording in Atlanta. “With Brendan in the band for a few weeks, we all knew a lot more about how we were going to approach things once we got to the studio,” says Dylan. “For one thing, he refuses to waste time. Usually people like to camp out in a studio and don’t plan on leaving for months. Brendan’s attitude was, “We can do this in four weeks.” It’s not like he was impatient or had other things lined up, it’s his belief – borne out by years of experience in making great records – that if you’re thinking about things too much and making it complicated, than you’re probably doing something wrong.”

On Rebel, Sweetheart, The Wallflowers and O’Brien were clearly doing something right, and the result is the most focused and accomplished album of their career. “It was great for us because we’ve always worked in L.A., and I think that’s why our records have dragged on,” Dylan says. “Recording close to home means that we’re all juggling our work and our personal lives. Of course, that’s what most people have to do every day, but we found out that it’s just not the best way to go about making a record. With Brendan, we worked at a pace that kept us on our toes, and that’s exactly what we needed. I can’t recall the usual tedious time sitting around the studio waiting for food and being bored. We used every minute we were there.”

Appropriately, then, Rebel, Sweetheart is an album very much informed by time and its inevitable passage. This is an album full of songs written by a man and performed by a band that’s already lived a little. Though the album is full of some of Dylan’s wittiest lines, those sorts of more sober and serious concerns are all over Rebel, Sweetheart. The opening “Days of Wonder” for instance is not the sunny rock anthem the title might suggest. More revealing of the album’s emotional complexities is that song’s reference to “seven different shades of grey spreading out across the arc.” Gradually, it dawns on the listener that ‘wonder’ is not meant as a sense of awe, it refers to being filled with doubt. “People looked at the title of the last album Red Letter Days and assumed it was upbeat too. I’ve always been drawn to that sort of contradiction.”

Rebel, Sweetheart is full of such beautiful and powerful contradictions. As he told USA Today earlier this year, Considering the chaotic times that we’re living in, I found it unavoidable to write songs that weren’t embedded with curiosity, panic and wonder.“ The album’s first single “The Beautiful Side of Somewhere” is a powerful expression of hope and, at the same time, an acknowledgement of life’s inherent difficulties. “It’s about dealing with the realization that the answers you thought you’d eventually get may never actually come. Yet you strive to hold onto the belief that there must be something – a place, a feeling, a state of mind – that is actually better than where you are right now.”

One of the album’s most moving songs, “God Says Nothing Back” shares a similar sentiment with “The Beautiful Side Of Somewhere” and encompasses many of the themes that inhabit Dylan’s work, namely God, time, love and death. As he explains, “It often seems that everything worth thinking about is somehow wrapped up in those four topics.”

Another Rebel standout, “We’re Already There” is rooted in related thoughts. “A lot of this record is trapped in time. For me, it’s understanding that I’m not the same person I was when I first started this band; that time has certainly shifted my view on things – as it does to most of us - and that trying to hold onto old perspectives is just unwise.”

In Rebel, Sweetheart, The Wallflowers have created an album that yearns for clarity while reflecting the world’s complexity – a sometimes dark but somehow inspiring gem of an album that reflects a recommitment and fittingly ends with an uncharacteristically hopeful song called “All Things New Again.” For Dylan, The Wallflowers feel in some ways new again. As he explains. “We’ve gone a lot farther and
become a much better band than many thought we would. But it’s not
out of stubbornness or any misdirected sense of obligation that keeps us together. We just feel that we want to keep making the best records we can because we want there to be a Wallflowers legacy – not just a handful of records. That’s how I always envisioned The Wallflowers from the very beginning: As a band that was going to matter for a long time.

The band members’ musical chemistry and easy interaction is well displayed in the 30-minute film they made exclusively for inclusion on the Dual Disc version of Rebel Sweetheart. The Wallflowers let the cameras roll on a marathon recording session during which they dramatically rearranged and recorded new versions of their hits, “One Headlight,” and “6th Avenue Heartache,” as well as the fan favorites “Some Flowers Bloom Dead,” “For The Life Of Me,” and the previously unreleased “Halo” (which had only been played live several times and had piqued fan interest through bootlegs). The band also sat down for a not-so-serious interview with actor/comedian Jon Lovitz to discuss these songs and the band’s creative process, as well as to shed light on some long-debated queries such as who would win if The Wallflowers got in a fight with Green Day.

One question does remain, though: What about that mysterious, evocative album title? “Well, other than saying that ‘Rebel’ is a verb, not a noun, I’m going to let it’s meaning remain open to interpretation. Besides,” Dylan says with a laugh, “the fans’ ideas are often more interesting.”

Jakob Dylan – Guitar & Vocals
Fred Eltringham – Drums
Rami Jaffee – Keyboards
Greg Richling – Bass "
music777
19.05.2005 - 17:31 Uhr
Auf MSN gibt es Hörproben aller Songs von Rebel Sweetheart:

MSN Rebel Sweetheart
music777
23.05.2005 - 11:48 Uhr
Allmusic-Review by Stephen Thomas Erlewine:

"The Wallflowers, particularly their leader, Jakob Dylan, can't catch a break. They're not only bound to be compared — not entirely fairly but certainly understandably — to Jakob's father, Bob, but an equally large burden is that they're a straight-ahead rock band in a time that doesn't value straight-ahead rock bands. They were able to ride the post-alternative wave to the top of the charts in the mid-'90s, when all guitar bands were lumped into a nebulous alt-rock scene, but just a few years later, in the aftermath of trip-hop, MTV Amp, and OK Computer, all big rock bands were expected to tackle the serious challenge of electronica, since that was the wave of the future and all. Didn't matter if they were groups as singularly unequipped to fuse loops and guitars as R.E.M. or Oasis — they all made tentative attempts to reconcile classicist rock with futurist electronica. Not the Wallflowers. They stuck to their guns and made driving, songwriter-oriented rock & roll in the vein of Springsteen, Tom Petty, and John Mellencamp. This stubbornness served their music well, but it won them no new fans, either among critics or the general public, who criticized them for being what they are: a working rock band, pure and simple. On each record, they have variations on their signature sound, given a slightly different spin depending on what producers they work with, but that's what most rock bands, good or bad, do — they make records and go on tour. This happened more in the '70s and '80s than in the '90s and 2000s, when dwindling audiences and corporatization kept bands off the road and out of the studio for long stretches of time, but the Wallflowers remain a rock band in the traditional sense, mining a similar vein on Rebel, Sweetheart, their fifth album, as they did on their first. While there are no musical surprises here, this is a better album than its predecessor, Red Letter Days, not just because it's a stronger, more varied set of songs, but because they finally have a perfectly matched producer in Brendan O'Brien. Like his recent productions for Bruce Springsteen, O'Brien helps focus and revitalize the Wallflowers, opening up the music through subtly textured overdubs but also giving the band a harder attack than they've ever had. Simply put, they've never sounded better as a band than they do here, and they've never had a record as robust and interesting on a pure sonic level as they do here. Not that Rebel, Sweetheart offers anything all that different from previous Wallflowers albums — they just do what they do better than they have before. Ultimately, there's a certain comfort in knowing that the Wallflowers can deliver sturdy, engaging classicist rock like this, since it makes them different from other rock bands of their time in yet another way: they're reliable."

music777
23.05.2005 - 14:53 Uhr
Nach Amazon und WOM erscheint das Album auch in Deutschland: VÖ 7.6.05 !
Armin
06.06.2005 - 12:57 Uhr
Ja, richtig. Über den "Universal Music International Service", eine Abordnung von Universal, die die "kleineren" Import-Themen frühzeitig in Regal bringt.

Infos zur Veröffentlichung hier

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